Product Quality and Entering through Tying: Experimental Evidence

18 Pages Posted: 30 May 2018 Last revised: 3 Dec 2018

See all articles by Hyunjin Kim

Hyunjin Kim

Harvard University - Business School (HBS)

Michael Luca

Harvard University - Business School (HBS)

Date Written: December 3, 2018

Abstract

Dominant platform businesses often develop products in adjacent markets to complement their core business. One common approach used to gain traction in these adjacent markets has been to pursue a tying strategy. For example, Microsoft pre-installed Internet Explorer into Windows, and Apple set Apple Maps as the iOS default. Policymakers have raised concerns that dominant platforms may be leveraging their market power to gain traction for lower quality products when they use a tying strategy. In this paper, we empirically explore this question by examining Google’s decision to tie its new reviews product to its search engine. We experimentally vary the reviews displayed above Google’s organic search results to show either exclusively Google reviews (Google’s current tying strategy), or reviews from multiple platforms determined to be the best-performing by Google’s own organic search algorithm. We find that users prefer the version that does not exclude competitor reviews. Furthermore, looking at observational data on user traffic to Yelp from search engines, we find that Google’s exclusion of downstream competitors may have been effective. The share of Yelp’s traffic coming from Google has declined over this period, relative to traffic from Bing and Yahoo (which do not exclude other companies’ reviews), and Google reviews has grown quicker than Yelp and TripAdvisor during the period in which they excluded these (and other) reviews providers. Overall, these results shed light on platform strategy: tying has the potential to facilitate entry in complementary markets, even when the tied product is of worse quality than competitors.

Suggested Citation

Kim, Hyunjin and Luca, Michael, Product Quality and Entering through Tying: Experimental Evidence (December 3, 2018). Harvard Business School NOM Unit Working Paper No. 19-045, Forthcoming in Management Science, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3180721 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3180721

Hyunjin Kim (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Business School (HBS) ( email )

Soldiers Field Road
Morgan 270C
Boston, MA 02163
United States

Michael Luca

Harvard University - Business School (HBS) ( email )

Soldiers Field Road
Boston, MA 02163
United States

HOME PAGE: http://drfd.hbs.edu/fit/public/facultyInfo.do?facInfo=ovr&facId=602417

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