Ke Kānāwai Māmalahoe: Equality in Our Splintered Profession

39 Pages Posted: 28 Jun 2018

See all articles by Troy J.H. Andrade

Troy J.H. Andrade

University of Hawai'i at Mānoa | William S. Richardson School of Law

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

The bar examination has been an insurmountable barrier for many legally trained bar applicants for much, if not all, of its existence. It has placed an indefensible premium on the applicant’s ability to memorize laws covering a plethora of topics. There exist, however, more profound justifications for the bar examination’s ultimate elimination. The examination is, unfortunately, a recapitulation of centuries of overt exclusion and discrimination from the legal profession. In an attempt to heal the societal wounds of the bar examination, this comment proposes an alternative for bar admissions in the twenty-first century. Using the State of Hawai‘i as a model for reform, this comment suggests that the use of a diploma privilege, combined with retooled legal pedagogical practices and mandatory continuing legal education courses and pro bono service, offers a persuasive substitute for the bar examination that will help mend our splintered profession.

Suggested Citation

Andrade, Troy, Ke Kānāwai Māmalahoe: Equality in Our Splintered Profession (2010). University of Hawaii Law Review, Vol. 33, No. 249, 2010; University of Hawai’i Richardson School of Law Research Paper No. 3193247. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3193247

Troy Andrade (Contact Author)

University of Hawai'i at Mānoa | William S. Richardson School of Law ( email )

William S. Richardson School of Law
2515 Dole Street
Honolulu, HI 96822
United States
8089566543 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.hawaii.edu/person/troy-jh-andrade-11

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