The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: A Pan-Canadian Platform for Research on Chronic Disease Prevention

Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), 2018

Posted: 31 Jul 2018 Last revised: 25 Nov 2018

See all articles by Trevor Dummer

Trevor Dummer

University of British Columbia (UBC) - School of Population and Public Health

Philip Awadalla

Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR)

Catherine Boileau

University of Montreal

Camille Craig

CHUM Research Center

Isabel Fortier

McGill University - Department of Medicine

Vivek Goel

Clinical Public Health Division

Jason Hicks

Population Cancer Research Program

Sébastien Jacquemont

University of Montreal

Bartha Maria Knoppers

Centre of Genomics and Policy

Nhu Le

BC Cancer Research Centre (BCCRC)

Treena McDonald

BC Generations Project

John McLaughlin

Public Health Ontario

Anne-Marie Mes-Masson

University of Montreal

Anne-Monique Nuyt

University of Montreal

Lyle Palmer

University of Adelaide

Louise Parker

Department of Medicine

Mark Purdue

Government of the United States of America - Intramural Research Program (IRP)

Paula Robson

University of Alberta

John Spinelli

Vice President, Population Oncology

David Thompson

Atlantic PATH

Jennifer Vena

Alberta Health Services

Ma'n H. Zawati

McGill University - Centre of Genomics and Policy

CPTP Regional Cohort

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP)

Date Written: June 11, 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding the complex interaction of risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing common diseases is challenging. The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) is a prospective cohort study created as a population-health research platform for assessing the effect of genetics, behaviour, family health history and environment (among other factors) on chronic diseases. METHODS: Volunteer participants were recruited from the general Canadian population for a confederation of 5 regional cohorts. Participants were enrolled in the study and core information obtained using 2 approaches: attendance at a study assessment centre for all study measures (questionnaire, venous blood sample and physical measurements) or completion of the core questionnaire (online or paper), with later collection of other study measures where possible. Physical measurements included height, weight, percentage body fat and blood pressure. Participants consented to passive follow-up through linkage with administrative health databases and active follow-up through recontact. All participant data across the 5 regional cohorts were harmonized. RESULTS: A total of 307 017 participants aged 30–74 from 8 provinces were recruited. More than half provided a venous blood sample and/or other biological sample, and 33% completed physical measurements. A total of 709 harmonized variables were created; almost 25% are available for all participants and 60% for at least 220 000 participants. INTERPRETATION: Primary recruitment for the CPTP is complete, and data and biosamples are available to Canadian and international researchers through a data-access process. The CPTP will support research into how modifiable risk factors, genetics and the environment interact to affect the development of cancer and other chronic diseases, ultimately contributing evidence to reduce the global burden of chronic disease. Chronic disease prevention and individualized disease management are central to public health in the 21st century.1,2 However, the multifactorial etiology of most chronic diseases demands that we increase our understanding about how biology, genetics, environment and behaviours interact to affect disease risks and outcomes. Prospective cohort studies that track individuals over decades are important tools for exploring these complex interactions.3 One such tool is the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) — a pan-Canadian prospective cohort that was envisioned in 2008 as a “population laboratory”4,5 to support Canadian and international population health research in evaluating the genetic, behavioural and environmental causes of cancer and other chronic diseases. The CPTP set out with an ambitious goal to recruit 300 000 participants from 8 Canadian provinces,4 and to obtain a venous blood sample for biobanking from as many participants as possible. It is the largest prospective cohort ever created in Canada, and baseline data are now available to Canadian and international researchers. The aim of this article is to provide a baseline cohort profile of the CPTP, summarizing key sociodemographic, behavioural and health-related characteristics of the participants. We summarize the CPTP design and participant recruitment, the harmonization of the core data, the biorepository, and the procedures established to support data sharing with researchers.

Keywords: pan-canadian, research, chronic disease, prevention

Suggested Citation

Dummer, Trevor and Awadalla, Philip and Boileau, Catherine and Craig, Camille and Fortier, Isabel and Goel, Vivek and Hicks, Jason and Jacquemont, Sébastien and Knoppers, Bartha Maria and Le, Nhu and McDonald, Treena and McLaughlin, John and Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie and Nuyt, Anne-Monique and Palmer, Lyle and Parker, Louise and Purdue, Mark and Robson, Paula and Spinelli, John and Thompson, David and Vena, Jennifer and Zawati, Ma'n H. and Cohort, CPTP Regional, The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project: A Pan-Canadian Platform for Research on Chronic Disease Prevention (June 11, 2018). Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3194670

Trevor Dummer

University of British Columbia (UBC) - School of Population and Public Health ( email )

Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada

Philip Awadalla

Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) ( email )

Canada

Catherine Boileau

University of Montreal ( email )

Camille Craig

CHUM Research Center ( email )

Isabel Fortier

McGill University - Department of Medicine ( email )

Montreal, Quebec
Canada

Vivek Goel

Clinical Public Health Division ( email )

Jason Hicks

Population Cancer Research Program ( email )

Sébastien Jacquemont

University of Montreal ( email )

Bartha Maria Knoppers

Centre of Genomics and Policy ( email )

3640 rue University
Rm W-315, Strathcona Anatomy & Dentistry Building
Montréal, QC H3A 0C7
Canada

Nhu Le

BC Cancer Research Centre (BCCRC) ( email )

Treena McDonald

BC Generations Project ( email )

John McLaughlin

Public Health Ontario ( email )

Kingston, Ontario
Canada

Anne-Marie Mes-Masson

University of Montreal ( email )

Anne-Monique Nuyt

University of Montreal ( email )

Lyle Palmer

University of Adelaide ( email )

No 233 North Terrace, School of Commerce
Adelaide, South Australia 5005
Australia

Louise Parker

Department of Medicine ( email )

6225 University Avenue
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H7
Canada

Mark Purdue

Government of the United States of America - Intramural Research Program (IRP) ( email )

Bethesda, MD 20892
United States

Paula Robson

University of Alberta ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3
Canada

John Spinelli

Vice President, Population Oncology ( email )

2329 West Mall
Vancouver, British Columbia BC V6T 1Z4
Canada

David Thompson

Atlantic PATH ( email )

Jennifer Vena

Alberta Health Services ( email )

Seventh Street Plaza
14th Floor, North Tower
Edmonton, Alberta 10030
Canada

Ma'n H. Zawati (Contact Author)

McGill University - Centre of Genomics and Policy ( email )

740 Dr. Penfield Avenue, Suite 5200
Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G1
Canada

CPTP Regional Cohort

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) ( email )

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