Abstract

https://ssrn.com/abstract=319700
 


 



On Using U.S. Diplomatic Records for Research on African Constitutions: A Guide to the Archives


Mary L. Dudziak


Emory University School of Law

2002

Newsletter of the Africa Section, 2002

Abstract:     
A rich, but unexpected, source for research in African constitutional history is records of the U.S. Department of State at the National Archives. Because the State Department followed African constitutional politics, particularly as African nations moved toward independence in the 1950s and 60s, U.S. diplomatic records document African constitutional developments, and sometimes include local sources, such as competing constitutional proposals. Drawing upon her own research on constitutional politics in Kenya in the early 1960s, the author describes the sort of primary sources that might be found in U.S. diplomatic records. Because these sources are rarely used by legal scholars, this essay provides a practical guide to constitutional history research in U.S. diplomatic records.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 8


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Date posted: July 26, 2002  

Suggested Citation

Dudziak, Mary L., On Using U.S. Diplomatic Records for Research on African Constitutions: A Guide to the Archives (2002). Newsletter of the Africa Section, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=319700 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.319700

Contact Information

Mary L. Dudziak (Contact Author)
Emory University School of Law ( email )
1301 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States

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