Giving Time: Examining Sector Differences in Volunteering Intensity

43 Pages Posted: 26 Jul 2018

See all articles by Stephen Holt

Stephen Holt

State University of New York (SUNY) - Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy

Date Written: June 19, 2018

Abstract

Sector differences in prosocial motivations and behaviors among workers receives a great deal of attention in public administration scholarship. Extant literature consistently finds public sector workers are more likely to engage in prosocial behaviors, such as volunteering, than their peers in the private sector. Less attention has been paid to the sector gap in volunteerism along the intensive margin. Using time-diary data, which accounts for potential social desirability bias, from a nationally representative sample, this study investigates the gap between public sector workers and their private sector counterparts. The results suggest that public sector workers spend much more time, on an average day, volunteering than observably similar private sector peers, and the difference cannot be explained by other observable differences between public and private sector workers. The gap in volunteer intensity is largest at the local level and among teachers. The implications of these results for research and practice are discussed.

Keywords: Volunteering, Time Use, Public Sector Workforce, Public Service Motivation

JEL Classification: H83, H41

Suggested Citation

Holt, Stephen, Giving Time: Examining Sector Differences in Volunteering Intensity (June 19, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3199037 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3199037

Stephen Holt (Contact Author)

State University of New York (SUNY) - Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy ( email )

1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12222
United States

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