Air Pollution and Lost Work

40 Pages Posted: 15 Mar 2004 Last revised: 23 Oct 2013

See all articles by Jerry A. Hausman

Jerry A. Hausman

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Bart D. Ostro

California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) - Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment

David A. Wise

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Harvard University - Harvard Kennedy School (HKS)

Date Written: 1984

Abstract

A Poisson specification of the relationship between atmospheric pollution and lost work days is estimated.An important feature of the procedure is control for city-specific effects. A major source of ambiguity in interpreting the results of observational data on pollution versus health status or death rates is that pollution in a city may be correlated with other characteristics ofthat city that affect these outcomes but are not controlled for in the analysis. Or, individual attributes of residents may be correlated with pollution levels but notaccounted for in the analysis. Our results suggest a statistically significantand quantitatively important effect of total suspended particulates on work days lost. A standard deviation increase in total suspended particulates is associated with approximately a ten percent increase in work days lost. As a concomitant of our analysis, we also find a substantial relationship between smoking by others in the individual's household and work days lost by non-smokers.

Suggested Citation

Hausman, Jerry A. and Ostro, Bart D. and Wise, David A., Air Pollution and Lost Work (1984). NBER Working Paper No. w1263. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=321314

Jerry A. Hausman (Contact Author)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Economics ( email )

50 Memorial Drive
Room E52-271a
Cambridge, MA 02142
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617-253-3644 (Phone)
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Bart D. Ostro

California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) - Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment

Oakland, CA
United States

David A. Wise

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Harvard University - Harvard Kennedy School (HKS)

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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