Does When You Die Depend on Where You Live? Evidence from Hurricane Katrina

79 Pages Posted: 16 Jul 2018

See all articles by Tatyana Deryugina

Tatyana Deryugina

University of Illinois

David Molitor

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date Written: July 2018

Abstract

We follow Medicare cohorts over time and space to estimate Hurricane Katrina's long-run mortality effects on elderly and disabled victims initially living in New Orleans. Inclusive of the initial shock, the hurricane improved survival eight years past the storm by 1.74 percentage points. Migration to lower-mortality regions explains most of this survival increase. Migrants to low- versus high-mortality regions look similar at baseline, but migrants’ subsequent mortality is 0.83-0.90 percentage points lower for each percentage-point reduction in local mortality, quantifying causal effects of place on mortality among this population. By contrast, migrants’ mortality is unrelated to local Medicare spending.

Suggested Citation

Deryugina, Tatyana and Molitor, David, Does When You Die Depend on Where You Live? Evidence from Hurricane Katrina (July 2018). NBER Working Paper No. w24822. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3214368

Tatyana Deryugina (Contact Author)

University of Illinois ( email )

1206 South Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

HOME PAGE: http://deryugina.com

David Molitor

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

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