Dishing Up Migrant Workers for the Canadian Food Services Sector: Labor Law and the Demand for Migrant Workers

28 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2018

See all articles by Judy Fudge

Judy Fudge

Kent Law School; University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law Study Group

Joo-Cheong Tham

University of Melbourne

Date Written: 2017

Abstract

This article examines one subsector-food services-in order to explore the symbiotic relationship between migration controls and labor market regulation with the goal of illustrating how labor market institutions in a specific sector shape government responses to employers' demand for migrant labor. Specifically, we focus on the demand for migrant labor in the food services sector in the province of British Columbia in Canada to show how labor regulation in that sector reinforces precarious work, creates a domestic labor shortage, and shapes employer preferences for migrant workers. We use the case study to address two questions: How does the institutional and regulatory framework for the food services sector in the province of British Columbia shape employer demand for migrant workers? How did the federal government respond to employer demand for migrant workers in the food services sector?

Suggested Citation

Fudge, Judy and Tham, Joo-Cheong, Dishing Up Migrant Workers for the Canadian Food Services Sector: Labor Law and the Demand for Migrant Workers (2017). Comparative Labor Law & Policy Journal, 2017. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3216971

Judy Fudge

Kent Law School ( email )

Keynes College
Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP
United Kingdom

University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law Study Group

Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States

Joo-Cheong Tham (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, Victoria 3053
Australia

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