Who Speaks for Neuroscience? Neuroimaging Evidence and Courtroom Expertise

23 Pages Posted: 30 Jul 2018

See all articles by Jane Campbell Moriarty

Jane Campbell Moriarty

Duquesne University - School of Law

Daniel Langleben

University of Pennsylvania - Perelman School of Medicine

Date Written: 2018

Abstract

This article explores the issue of proper qualifications necessary for expert witnesses who testify about structural and functional neuroimaging evidence. It outlines the nature of the problem; explains some of the complexity of the question of expertise as a matter of medicine, science, and law, using criminal cases involving mental health as a helpful template to discuss the issues; provides some thoughts about better regulating neuroimaging evidence by focusing on the qualifications of experts; and offers modest policy suggestions to address the question of expert competence.

Keywords: Evidence, Experts, Neuroscience, Qualifications

Suggested Citation

Moriarty, Jane C. and Langleben, Daniel, Who Speaks for Neuroscience? Neuroimaging Evidence and Courtroom Expertise (2018). Case Western Reserve Law Review, Forthcoming, Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2018-13, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3221041

Jane C. Moriarty (Contact Author)

Duquesne University - School of Law ( email )

600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
United States

Daniel Langleben

University of Pennsylvania - Perelman School of Medicine ( email )

423 Guardian Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

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