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Persistent Gamma Spiking in Non-Sensory Fast-Spiking Cells Predicts Perceptual Success

35 Pages Posted: 6 Aug 2018   Sneak Peek Status: Under Review

Hyeyoung Shin

Brown University - Department of Neuroscience

Christopher I. Moore

Brown University - Department of Neuroscience

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Abstract

Persistent gamma oscillations (30-55Hz) are hypothesized to temporally coordinate stimulus encoding, enabling perception. This prediction poses a conundrum: How can gamma serve as a template when the stimulus itself drives its mediators, presumably perturbing its maintenance? Specifically, fast-spiking interneurons (FS), a key gamma generator, can be highly sensory responsive. Further, the gamma-band local field potential (LFP) shows properties inconsistent with temporal coordination. Combining tetrode recording with controlled psychophysics revealed an FS subtype (γnsFS) that was not sensory responsive, whose inter-spike intervals peaked at gamma, and that fired with higher periodicity than other FS. Successful detection was predicted by increased regularity in γnsFS spiking at gamma, persisting from before to after sensory onset. In contrast, gamma LFP power negatively predicted detection, and was negatively related to gamma band spiking by γnsFS. These results suggest that a distinct interneuron subgroup, not ‘distracted’ by sensory input, mediates perceptually-relevant oscillations independent of LFP.

Suggested Citation

Shin, Hyeyoung and Moore, Christopher I., Persistent Gamma Spiking in Non-Sensory Fast-Spiking Cells Predicts Perceptual Success (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3227094 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3227094
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Hyeyoung Shin

Brown University - Department of Neuroscience

Box 1860
Providence, RI 02912
United States

Christopher I. Moore (Contact Author)

Brown University - Department of Neuroscience ( email )

Box 1860
Providence, RI 02912
United States