Labour Law and Transnational Law: The Fate of Legal Fields / The Trajectory of Legal Scholarship

14 Pages Posted: 7 Aug 2018

See all articles by Harry W. Arthurs

Harry W. Arthurs

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School

Date Written: June 30, 2015

Abstract

In this lecture, I’m going to explain how and why I came to write my article, The Law of Economic Subordination and Resistance. I hope that by doing so, I will be able to shed some light not only on my own field of labour law, but on the larger problem of how legal fields or domains of legal knowledge, come into existence, change or become obsolete, and in the end are either transformed or superseded altogether. I will be talking about labour law, but I hope you will be thinking about transnational law. I’m going to try to persuade you that the invention and transformation of these two fields have something in common. But I’m going to go further. I hope to convince you that their ultimate fate is determined by some of the very same forces. Transnational law, I am going to argue, can only survive if it learns from the short, sad history of labour law.

Keywords: Labour law, Transnational law, Legal scholarship

JEL Classification: K31

Suggested Citation

Arthurs, Harry W., Labour Law and Transnational Law: The Fate of Legal Fields / The Trajectory of Legal Scholarship (June 30, 2015). Osgoode Legal Studies Research Paper Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3228120 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3228120

Harry W. Arthurs (Contact Author)

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Canada

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
33
Abstract Views
184
PlumX Metrics