The Turn to Managed Interdependence: A Glimpse into the Future of International Economic Law?

EJIL Talk!, blog of the European Journal of International Law, August 14, 2018

4 Pages Posted: 24 Aug 2018

See all articles by Henrique Choer Moraes

Henrique Choer Moraes

Embassy of Brazil in New Zealand ; KU Leuven

Date Written: August 14, 2018

Abstract

Beyond the unpredictability injected into the international order in the wake of policies adopted by the current US administration, a trend seems to be taking shape: the management of interdependence. The belief whereby increased global integration and connectivity would bring peace, stability and prosperity has never been as challenged as presently, when links between states are occasionally “weaponized” in the pursuit of goals that increasingly blur the economic, political and strategic divides. This scenario pre-dates the Trump period. It was described in an influential 2016 publication by the European Council on Foreign Relations as one where interdependence “has turned into a currency of power, as countries try to exploit the asymmetries in their relations”. In reaction, states are reassessing their exposure to an interdependent global order, seeking to mitigate perceived vulnerabilities that might stem from connectivity and openness. International law is likely to be transformed if this trend gains traction. A number of international rules and institutions were premised on – and, in fact, harnessed – the interdependence that marked the post-Cold War environment. This article offers insights into possible implications of managed interdependence for international economic law, an area where states are increasingly resorting to “economic statecraft” in order to advance strategic interests. As evidenced by the example of investment screening regulations, some of these interests — as national security – are pursued by the management of interdependence.

Suggested Citation

Choer Moraes, Henrique, The Turn to Managed Interdependence: A Glimpse into the Future of International Economic Law? (August 14, 2018). EJIL Talk!, blog of the European Journal of International Law, August 14, 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3230694

Henrique Choer Moraes (Contact Author)

Embassy of Brazil in New Zealand ( email )

Level 13, 10 Customhouse Quay
Wellington, 6011
New Zealand

KU Leuven ( email )

Belgium

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