New Evidence on the Impacts of Early Exposure to the 1918 Influenza Pandemic on Old-Age Mortality: A Research Note

9 Pages Posted: 20 Aug 2018

See all articles by Jason M. Fletcher

Jason M. Fletcher

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs; Yale University - School of Public Health

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence of the impacts of early life exposure to the 1918 pandemic on old-age mortality by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study (n ~ 220,000). The specifications used year and quarter of birth indicators to assess the effects of timing of pandemic exposure and used Cox proportional hazard models for all-cause mortality outcomes. The findings suggest evidence of excess all-cause mortality for cohorts born during 1918 and mixed evidence for cohorts born in 1917 and 1919. Therefore, contrary to some existing research, the results suggest no consistent evidence of the importance of specific windows of exposure by gestation period.

Keywords: early conditions, in utero, 1918 influenza pandemic, mortality

JEL Classification: I14

Suggested Citation

Fletcher, Jason M., New Evidence on the Impacts of Early Exposure to the 1918 Influenza Pandemic on Old-Age Mortality: A Research Note. IZA Discussion Paper No. 11715. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3234238

Jason M. Fletcher (Contact Author)

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs ( email )

1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
United States

Yale University - School of Public Health ( email )

PO Box 208034
60 College Street
New Haven, CT 06520-8034
United States

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