Plural Legal Systems and Equality: The Pakistani Experience

MEN'S LAWS, WOMEN'S LIVES: A CONSTITUTIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON RELIGION, COMMON LAW AND CULTURE IN SOUTH ASIA 138 (Indira Jaising ed., 2005)

35 Pages Posted: 10 Sep 2018 Last revised: 15 May 2019

See all articles by Jeffrey A. Redding

Jeffrey A. Redding

University of Melbourne - Law School

Date Written: January 1, 2005

Abstract

Of all the nations in South Asia, Pakistan experience with a plural legal system has perhaps been the most extensive, if only because an official Shariat judicial system was constitutionally established in Pakistan in 1979, thirty-two years after partition. With some minor organizational modifications, the existence of this "parallel" judicial system continues to this day. This chapter gives a brief introduction to Pakistan's overall legal system, and then also key aspects of Pakistan's Shariat judicial system. This discussion then sets the stage for a discussion of how gender equality proponents might maneuver in relation to this plural system.

Keywords: Pakistan, India, Personal Law, Islam, Equality

Suggested Citation

Redding, Jeffrey A., Plural Legal Systems and Equality: The Pakistani Experience (January 1, 2005). MEN'S LAWS, WOMEN'S LIVES: A CONSTITUTIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON RELIGION, COMMON LAW AND CULTURE IN SOUTH ASIA 138 (Indira Jaising ed., 2005), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3235898

Jeffrey A. Redding (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Law School ( email )

University Square
185 Pelham Street, Carlton
Victoria, Victoria 3010
Australia

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