Does Perceiving Discrimination Influence Partisanship Among U.S. Immigrant Minorities? Evidence from Five Experiments

41 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2018

See all articles by Daniel J. Hopkins

Daniel J. Hopkins

University of Pennsylvania

Cheryl Kaiser

University of Washington - Graduate Department of Psychology

Efren O. Perez

Vanderbilt University - Department of Political Science

Sara Haga

University of Lisbon - CICPSI

Corin Ramos

University of Texas at El Paso

Michael Zarate

University of Texas at El Paso

Date Written: August 21, 2018

Abstract

Perceived discrimination (PD) is reliably and strongly associated with party identity (PID) among U.S. immigrant minorities such as Latinos and Asian Americans. Yet whether PD causes PID remains unclear, since it is possible that partisanship influences perceptions of discrimination or that other factors drive the observed association. Here, we assess the causal influence of group-level PD on PID using five experiments with Latino and Asian American adults. These experiments varied in important ways: they took place inside and outside the lab, occurred prior to and during Donald Trump's presidential campaign, and tested different manifestations of perceived discrimination and partisan attitudes (total n=2,528). These efforts point to a simple but unexpected conclusion: our experiments and operationalizations do not support the claim that group-targeted PD directly causes PID. These results have important implications for understanding partisanship among immigrants and their co-ethnics and the political incorporation of Latinos and Asian Americans.

Keywords: perceived discrimination; partisanship; survey experiments; Latinos; Asian Americans; racial and ethnic politics

JEL Classification: J15

Suggested Citation

Hopkins, Daniel J. and Kaiser, Cheryl and Perez, Efren O. and Haga, Sara and Ramos, Corin and Zarate, Michael, Does Perceiving Discrimination Influence Partisanship Among U.S. Immigrant Minorities? Evidence from Five Experiments (August 21, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3236348 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3236348

Daniel J. Hopkins (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania ( email )

Stiteler Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.danhopkins.org

Cheryl Kaiser

University of Washington - Graduate Department of Psychology ( email )

Seattle, WA
United States

Efren O. Perez

Vanderbilt University - Department of Political Science ( email )

2301 Vanderbilt Place
Nashville, TN 37240
United States

Sara Haga

University of Lisbon - CICPSI ( email )

Alameda da Universidade
Lisboa, 1649-013
Portugal

Corin Ramos

University of Texas at El Paso ( email )

500 W University Ave
El Paso, TX 79902
United States

Michael Zarate

University of Texas at El Paso ( email )

500 W University Ave
El Paso, TX 79902
United States

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