Televising Justice During War

13 Pages Posted: 31 Aug 2018

See all articles by Austin L. Wright

Austin L. Wright

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy

Stephen Stapleton

University of Chicago, University of Chicago, Students

Andres Uribe

University of Chicago, Department of Political Science, Students

Date Written: August 23, 2018

Abstract

Television is an overlooked tool of state building. We estimate the impact of televising criminal proceedings on public use of government courts to resolve disputes. We draw on survey data from Afghanistan, where the government used television as a mechanism for enhancing the legitimacy of formal legal institutions during an ongoing conflict. We find consistent evidence of court ‘uptake’ among survey respondents who trust television following the nation’s first televised criminal trial. We find no evidence that public confidence in other government functions (e.g. economy, development, corruption) improved during this period . Our findings suggest that television may provide a means of building state legitimacy during war.

Keywords: civil war, justice systems, competitive governance

Suggested Citation

Wright, Austin L. and Stapleton, Stephen and Uribe, Andres, Televising Justice During War (August 23, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3237650 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3237650

Austin L. Wright (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy ( email )

1155 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.austinlwright.com

Stephen Stapleton

University of Chicago, University of Chicago, Students ( email )

IL
United States

Andres Uribe

University of Chicago, Department of Political Science, Students ( email )

Chicago, IL
United States

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