Repressive Experiences among China Scholars: New Evidence from Survey Data

35 Pages Posted: 23 Sep 2018  

Sheena Chestnut Greitens

University of Missouri

Rory Truex

Princeton University - Department of Political Science

Date Written: August 1, 2018

Abstract

This paper examines the nature of China’s current research climate and its effects on foreign scholarship. Drawing on an original survey of over 500 China scholars, we find that repressive research experiences are a rare but real phenomenon, and collectively present a barrier to the conduct of research in China. Roughly 9% of China scholars report having been “taken for tea” by authorities within the past ten years; 26% of scholars who conduct archival research report being denied access; and 5% of researchers report some difficulty obtaining a visa. The paper provides descriptive information on the nature of these experiences and their determinants. It concludes with a discussion of self-censorship and strategies for conducting research on China.

Keywords: China, research, repression, censorship

Suggested Citation

Chestnut Greitens, Sheena and Truex, Rory, Repressive Experiences among China Scholars: New Evidence from Survey Data (August 1, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3243059

Sheena Chestnut Greitens

University of Missouri ( email )

309 Professional Bldg.
Columbia, MI 65211-6030
United States

Rory Truex (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Corwin Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544-1012
United States

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