Incarceration Spillovers in Criminal and Family Networks

33 Pages Posted: 6 Sep 2018

See all articles by Manudeep Bhuller

Manudeep Bhuller

University of Oslo - Department of Economics; Statistics Norway

Gordon B. Dahl

UC San Diego - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Rochester - Department of Economics

Katrine Vellesen Løken

Norwegian School of Economics (NHH) - Department of Economics

Magne Mogstad

Statistics Norway; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: July 25, 2018

Abstract

Using quasi-random assignment of criminal cases to judges, we estimate large incarceration spillovers in criminal and brother networks. When a defendant is sent to prison, there are 51 and 32 percentage point reductions in the probability his criminal network members and younger brothers will be charged with a crime, respectively, over the ensuing four years. Correlational evidence misleadingly finds small positive effects. These spillovers are of first order importance for policy, as the network reductions in future crimes committed are larger than the direct effect on the incarcerated defendant.

Keywords: incarceration, peer effects, criminal networks

JEL Classification: K42

Suggested Citation

Bhuller, Manudeep and Dahl, Gordon B. and Løken, Katrine Vellesen and Mogstad, Magne, Incarceration Spillovers in Criminal and Family Networks (July 25, 2018). NHH Dept. of Economics Discussion Paper No. 15/2018. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3243321 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3243321

Manudeep Bhuller

University of Oslo - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 1095 Blindern
N-0317 Oslo
Norway

HOME PAGE: http://sites.google.com/site/manudeepbhuller

Statistics Norway ( email )

N-0033 Oslo
Norway

HOME PAGE: http://sites.google.com/site/manudeepbhuller

Gordon B. Dahl

UC San Diego - Department of Economics ( email )

9500 Gilman Drive
Mail Code 0502
La Jolla, CA 92093-0112
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

University of Rochester - Department of Economics ( email )

Harkness Hall
Rochester, NY 14627
United States

Katrine Vellesen Løken (Contact Author)

Norwegian School of Economics (NHH) - Department of Economics ( email )

Helleveien 30
N-5035 Bergen
Norway

Magne Mogstad

Statistics Norway ( email )

N-0033 Oslo
Norway

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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