Artificial Intelligence Evolution: On the Virtue of Killing in the Artificial Age

Journal of Sociology, Forthcoming

21 Pages Posted: 1 Oct 2018 Last revised: 28 Mar 2019

See all articles by Julia M. Puaschunder

Julia M. Puaschunder

Harvard University; The New School for Social Research; Columbia University; Princeton University; George Washington University Center for International Business Education and Research; The New School - Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (CEPA)

Date Written: September 11, 2018

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence (AI) poses historically unique challenges for humankind. In a world, where there is a currently ongoing blend between human beings and artificial intelligence, the emerging autonomy of AI holds unique potentials of eternal life. With AI being endowed with quasi-human rights and citizenship in the Western and Arabic worlds, the question arises how to handle overpopulation but also misbehavior of AI? Should AI become eternal or is there a virtue in switching off AI at a certain point? If so, we may have to redefine laws around killing, define a virtue of killing and draw on philosophy to answer the question how to handle the abyss of killing AI with ethical grace, rational efficiency and fair style. The presented theoretical results will set the ground for a controlled AI-evolution in the 21st century, in which humankind determines which traits should remain dominant and which are meant to be killed.

Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, AI, Algorithms, Cognitive Robotics, AI-Evolution, Emerging Technologies, Ethical Issues, Ethics, Human Robot Interaction, International Law, Killing, Legal Personhood, Roboethics, Robot-Rights, Social Robots, Virtue of Killing

Suggested Citation

Puaschunder, Julia M., Artificial Intelligence Evolution: On the Virtue of Killing in the Artificial Age (September 11, 2018). Journal of Sociology, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3247401 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3247401

Julia M. Puaschunder (Contact Author)

Harvard University ( email )

24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

The New School for Social Research ( email )

6 East 16th Street
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Columbia University ( email )

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New York, NY 10027
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Princeton University ( email )

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Princeton, NJ 08544-0708
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George Washington University Center for International Business Education and Research ( email )

2023 G Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
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The New School - Bernard Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (CEPA) ( email )

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5th Floor
New York, NY 10027
United States

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