Hierarchies of Categorical Disadvantage: Economic Insecurity at the Intersection of Disability, Gender and Race

Gender and Society. 2018, DOI/10.1177/0891243218794648

30 Pages Posted: 3 Oct 2018

See all articles by Michelle Maroto

Michelle Maroto

University of Alberta - Department of Sociology

David Pettinicchio

University of Toronto

Andrew C Patterson

Grant MacEwan University

Date Written: September 11, 2018

Abstract

Intersectional feminist scholars emphasize how overlapping systems of oppression structure gender inequality, but in focusing on the gendered, classed, and racialized bases of stratification, many often overlook disability as an important social category in determining economic outcomes. This is a significant omission given that disability severely limits opportunities and contributes to cumulative disadvantage. We draw from feminist disability and intersectional theories to account for how disability intersects with gender, race, and education to produce economic insecurity. The findings from our analyses of 2015 American Community Survey data provide strong empirical support for hierarchies of disadvantage, where women and racial minority groups with disabilities and less education experience the highest poverty levels, report the lowest total income, and have a greater reliance on sources outside the labor market for economic security. By taking disability into account, our study demonstrates how these multiple characteristics lead to overlapping oppressions that become embedded and reproduced within the larger social structure.

Keywords: Disability, Intersectionality, Economic Insecurity, Poverty, Inequality, Gender

Suggested Citation

Maroto, Michelle and Pettinicchio, David and Patterson, Andrew C, Hierarchies of Categorical Disadvantage: Economic Insecurity at the Intersection of Disability, Gender and Race (September 11, 2018). Gender and Society. 2018, DOI/10.1177/0891243218794648. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3247974

Michelle Maroto

University of Alberta - Department of Sociology ( email )

5-21 HM Tory Building
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H4
Canada

David Pettinicchio (Contact Author)

University of Toronto ( email )

Sociology
725 Spadina
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2J4
Canada

Andrew C Patterson

Grant MacEwan University

P.O. Box 1796
Rm 5-256F
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2P2 T5J4S2
Canada

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
13
Abstract Views
157
PlumX Metrics