Discrimination Litigation Vis-à-Vis Post-Colonial Colorism: Race Hegemony As Legacy of White Supremacy Eugenics

36 Pages Posted: 26 Oct 2018

See all articles by Ronald E. Hall

Ronald E. Hall

Michigan State University - College of Law

Date Written: 2018

Abstract

Although White supremacy and the false-science eugenics movement have dissipated, the colonial residues of human hierarchy remain, existing as byproducts of workplace discrimination litigation prompted by colorism. Colorism is a discriminatory behavior perpetuated by Caucasians and non-Caucasians against the darkest in skin color, regardless of race or ethnicity. Colorism is manifested as the Bleaching Syndrome, the internalization of physiological and sociological pathogens relative to dark skin that disrupt the process of assimilation. For indigenous peoples of central and southern Africa (Negroid groups) and populations of indigenous peoples of eastern Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Arctic region of North America (Mongoloid groups), the Bleaching Syndrome begins with the idealization of light skin, born of colonization and slavery. Workplace discrimination litigation should not be assessed by legal outcomes; the mere filing of workplace litigation establishes colorism via the disdain for dark skin, therefore driving workplace discrimination litigation in the new millennium.

Keywords: Bleaching Syndrome; Colorism; Discrimination; Eugenics; Litigation

Suggested Citation

Hall, Ronald, Discrimination Litigation Vis-à-Vis Post-Colonial Colorism: Race Hegemony As Legacy of White Supremacy Eugenics (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3260032 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3260032

Ronald Hall (Contact Author)

Michigan State University - College of Law

318 Law College Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1300
United States

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