Intentionally “Biased”: People Purposely Use To-Be-Ignored Information, But Can Be Persuaded Not To

forthcoming in The Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

34 Pages Posted:

See all articles by Berkeley Dietvorst

Berkeley Dietvorst

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Uri Simonsohn

Ramon Llull University - ESADE Business School

Date Written: October 22, 2018

Abstract

Abundant research has shown that people fail to disregard to-be-ignored information (e.g. hindsight bias, curse of knowledge), which has contributed to the popular notion that people are unwillingly and unconsciously affected by information. Here we provide evidence that, instead, people simply do not want to ignore such information. The findings: in Studies 1 & 2 the majority of participants explicitly indicate a desire to use to-be-ignored information in classic paradigms. In Study 3, the effect of receiving to-be-ignored information is driven entirely by the subset of people who want to use it. In Study 4, convincing participants to ignore inadmissible evidence in a mock jury paradigm is shown to reduce the impact of such evidence by convincing them to plan to ignore it.

Keywords: Hindsight Bias, Curse of knowledge, Decision making, Judgment, Jurors

Suggested Citation

Dietvorst, Berkeley and Simonsohn, Uri, Intentionally “Biased”: People Purposely Use To-Be-Ignored Information, But Can Be Persuaded Not To (October 22, 2018). forthcoming in The Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=

Berkeley Dietvorst (Contact Author)

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business ( email )

Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Uri Simonsohn

Ramon Llull University - ESADE Business School ( email )

Avinguda de la Torre Blanca, 59
Sant Cugat del Vallès, 08172
Spain

HOME PAGE: http://urisohn.com

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