lancet-header
Preprints with The Lancet is part of SSRN´s First Look, a place where journals and other research experts identify content of interest prior to publication. These preprint papers are not peer-reviewed. Authors have either opted in at submission to The Lancet family of journals to post their preprints on Preprints with The Lancet, or submitted directly via SSRN. The usual SSRN checks and a Lancet-specific check for appropriateness and transparency have been applied. Preprints available here are not Lancet publications or necessarily under review with a Lancet journal. These papers should not be used for clinical decision making or reporting of research to a lay audience without indicating that this is preliminary research that has not been peer-reviewed. For more information see the Comment published in The Lancet, or visit The Lancet´s FAQ page, and for any feedback please contact preprints@lancet.com

A Meta-Analysis for Association of Maternal Group B Streptococcus Colonization and Preterm Birth in Indian Population

20 Pages Posted: 25 Oct 2018

See all articles by Nancy Ashary

Nancy Ashary

ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health

Deepak Modi

ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health - Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory

More...

Abstract

Vaginal colonization of Group B streptococci (GBS) is known to be associated with increased risk of preterm birth. However, the prevalence of maternal colonization with GBS and its association with preterm births in the Indian context is an unrecognised and neglected problem.

Method: To determine the prevalence of Group B streptococci infection and the associated risk factors in pregnant Indian women, we did a meta-analysis by collecting data from 34 (1981-2017) studies comprising 9552 cases. The main outcome measures were prevalence of GBS colonization, factors that could influence the prevalence of GBS infection and the incidence of preterm birth and Premature Rupture Of Membrane (PROM) amongst GBS infected women.

Result: The prevalence of GBS infection in pregnant Indian women (35-37 weeks of gestation) is 7·7 % (744/9552) with a wide heterogeneity (CI 7·2-8·3%). The prevalence of GBS was 7·4% when culture method was used, 11·6% with the use of immunological method and 62% with use of molecular method. Detection rate for GBS almost doubled when enrichment was used in the culture method (8·1 vs. 4·4%). While most GBS infected women were asymptomatic. The prevalence of GBS colonization was higher in younger women (18-25 years) as compared to older (30-35 years) women (6·7% vs 3·6%), The risk of preterm delivery and PROM was higher amongst GBS infected women as compared to uninfected women (OR 7·9 and 5·5 respectively).

Interpretation: The prevalence of GBS is lower in in pregnant Indian women, however the risk of PROM and preterm births is relatively high.

Registration of Manuscript: The present manuscript bears the NIRRH ID: RA/689/10-18.

Funding Statement: Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)

Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no Conflict of Interest. DM lab at NIRRH is funded by ICMR, Department of Biotechnology (DBT) and Department of Science and Technology (DST) Govt of India.

Ethics Approval Statement: Not Applicable

Keywords: Preterm Birth, Group B Streptococci, GBS, Infection, PROM, India, Pregnancy, Women, Vaginal Colonization

Suggested Citation

Ashary, Nancy and Modi, Deepak, A Meta-Analysis for Association of Maternal Group B Streptococcus Colonization and Preterm Birth in Indian Population (October 19, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3271425 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3271425

Nancy Ashary

ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health

Mumbai
India

Deepak Modi (Contact Author)

ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health - Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory ( email )

JM Street, Parel
Mumbai, 400 012
United States

Click here to go to TheLancet.com

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
705
Downloads
98