The European Union and United States Immigration Systems: Why Border States Should Not Be the Beasts of Burden

Arizona Journal of International & Comparative Law Vol. 32, No. 3 2015

26 Pages Posted: 16 Nov 2018

Date Written: April 21, 2015

Abstract

The European Union (EU) and United States immigration systems are parallel because both 1) have union/federal government setting policy for semiautonomous regions, 2) are plagued by mass illegal immigration, and 3) have border states that are disproportionally burdened in coping and dealing with this illegal immigration. This Note will review the EU and U.S. immigration systems, their respective immigration histories, and their scholarly views of immigration trends and policies. From this review the analysis will examine how and why border states in both the EU and United States are similarly burdened by mass illegal immigration. Finally, this Note will recommend policy changes to shift the burden of illegal immigration solely away from border states thus making structural adjustments to create more effective and functional immigration systems. As explained in this Note, border states and surrounding communities limited ability to cope with mass illegal immigration is a systemic issue within the EU and United States that ultimately affects all member states. Because mass illegal immigration is an issue that affects all member states in the EU and United States, both the Commission and Federal systems, respectively need to invest in border states’ efforts to manage mass illegal immigration and enforce local and national immigration policies. Illegal immigration and its burden on border states affect all EU and U.S. member states regardless of point of entry. These affects include problem solving the cost of massive systems that process asylum applications, family relocation, and navigating the shifts in communities to accommodate recently immigrated individuals and families. Accordingly, the EU and the United States need to shift the burden of paying for border security from border states to a holistic approach. Instead, a system in which all states, regardless of location, contribute an equitable amount to the maintenance of the border and the support of many systems immigrants are processed through, such as hospitals, schools, and the welfare system, needs to be instituted.

Although there are more sensitive terms to describe individuals who enter a nation without correct legal documentation such as irregular or undocumented, the term illegal immigration will be used in this Note. By using this specific term the author is highlighting that border states are alone in the burden of enforcing EU Commission and U.S. Federal immigration laws.

Keywords: Immigration, Immigrant, EU, European Union, US, United States, Border States, Irregular, Undocumented, Enforcement

Suggested Citation

Locke, Jahna, The European Union and United States Immigration Systems: Why Border States Should Not Be the Beasts of Burden (April 21, 2015). Arizona Journal of International & Comparative Law Vol. 32, No. 3 2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3272424

Jahna Locke (Contact Author)

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

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