Global Alcohol Markets: Evolving Consumption Patterns, Regulations, and Industrial Organizations

Posted: 29 Oct 2018

See all articles by Kym Anderson

Kym Anderson

University of Adelaide - Centre for International Economic Studies (CIES); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); Australian National University

Giulia Meloni

KU Leuven - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance (LICOS)

Johan Swinnen

University of Leuven

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: October 2018

Abstract

For millennia, alcoholic drinks have played an important role in food security and health (both positive and negative), but consumption patterns of beer, wine, and spirits have altered substantially over the past two centuries. So too have their production technologies and industrial organization. Globalization and economic growth have contributed to considerable convergence in national alcohol consumption patterns. The industrial revolution contributed to excess consumption by stimulating demand and lowering the cost of alcohol. It also led to concentration in some alcohol industries, especially brewing. In recent years, the emergence of craft producers has countered firm concentration and the homogenization of alcoholic beverages. Meanwhile, governments have intervened extensively in alcohol markets to reduce excessive consumption, raise taxes, protect domestic industries, and/or ensure competition. These regulations have contributed to, and been affected by, the evolving patterns of consumption and changing structures of alcohol industries.

Suggested Citation

Anderson, Kym and Meloni, Giulia and Swinnen, Johan, Global Alcohol Markets: Evolving Consumption Patterns, Regulations, and Industrial Organizations (October 2018). Annual Review of Resource Economics, Vol. 10, Issue 1, pp. 105-132, 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3274160 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-resource-100517-023331

Kym Anderson

University of Adelaide - Centre for International Economic Studies (CIES) ( email )

School of Economics
Adelaide SA 5005
Australia
+61 8 8313 4712 (Phone)
+61 8 8223 1460 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Australian National University ( email )

Arndt-Corden Dept of Economics
Coombs Building
Canberra, AK ACT 2600
Australia
+61 8 8313 4712 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://publicpolicy.anu.edu.au/crawford_people/content/staff/acde/kanderson.php

Giulia Meloni (Contact Author)

KU Leuven - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance (LICOS) ( email )

Waaistraat 6 - box 3511
Leuven, 3000
Belgium

Johan Swinnen

University of Leuven ( email )

Celestijnenlaan 200F
B-3001
Leuven
Belgium

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