Academic Misconduct, Misrepresentation and Gaming: A Reassessment

Forthcoming in Research Policy

51 Pages Posted: 19 Nov 2018

See all articles by Mario Biagioli

Mario Biagioli

University of California, Davis - School of Law

Martin Kenney

University of California, Davis

Ben Martin

SPRU, University of Sussex; University of Cambridge - Judge Business School - Centre for Science and Policy (CSAP) and Centre for Business Research (CBR)

John P. Walsh

Georgia Institute of Technology

Date Written: November 9, 2018

Abstract

The motivation for this Special Issue is increasing concern not only with academic misconduct but also with less easily defined forms of misrepresentation and gaming. In an era of intense emphasis on measuring academic performance, there has been a proliferation of scandals, questionable behaviors and devious stratagems involving not just individuals but also organizations, including universities, editors and reviewers, journal publishers, and conference organizers. This introduction first reviews the literature on the prevalence of academic misconduct, misrepresentation and gaming (MMG). The core of the article is organized around a life-cycle model of the production and dissemination of research results. We synthesize the findings in the MMG literature at the level of the investigator or research team, emphasizing that misbehavior extends well beyond fabrication and falsification to include behaviors designed to exaggerate or to mislead readers as to the significance of research findings. MMG is next explored in the post-research review, publication, and post-publication realms. Moving from the individual researcher to the organizational level, we examine how MMG can be engaged in by either journals or organizations employing or funding the researchers. The changing institutional environment including the growth of research assessment exercises, increased quantitative output measurement and greater pressure to publish may all encourage MMG. In the final section, we summarize the main conclusions and offer suggestions both on how we might best address the problems and on topics for future research.

Keywords: academic misconduct, research fraud, academic misrepresentation, gaming, predatory journals, pseudo conferences

Suggested Citation

Biagioli, Mario and Kenney, Martin and Martin, Benjamin R. and Walsh, John P., Academic Misconduct, Misrepresentation and Gaming: A Reassessment (November 9, 2018). Forthcoming in Research Policy. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3282001 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3282001

Mario Biagioli

University of California, Davis - School of Law ( email )

Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall
Davis, CA CA 95616-5201
United States

Martin Kenney (Contact Author)

University of California, Davis ( email )

Community and Regional Development Unit
Davis, CA 95616
United States
5305745943 (Phone)

Benjamin R. Martin

SPRU, University of Sussex ( email )

The Freeman Centre, Jubilee Building
Falmer
Brighton, Sussex BN1 9SL
United Kingdom
01273 873562 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/spru/people/lists/person/1716

University of Cambridge - Judge Business School - Centre for Science and Policy (CSAP) and Centre for Business Research (CBR)

Top Floor, Judge Business School Building
Trumpington Street
Cambridge, CB2 1AG
United Kingdom

John P. Walsh

Georgia Institute of Technology ( email )

Atlanta, GA 30332
United States

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