The Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers

64 Pages Posted: 12 Nov 2018 Last revised: 4 Jul 2021

See all articles by Seth Gershenson

Seth Gershenson

American University - School of Public Affairs

Cassandra Hart

University of California, Davis

Joshua Hyman

University of Connecticut - Department of Public Policy; University of Connecticut - Neag School of Education; University of Connecticut - Department of Economics

Constance Lindsay

American University

Nicholas W. Papageorge

Johns Hopkins University Department of Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: November 2018

Abstract

We examine the long-run impacts of exposure to a Black teacher for both Black and white students. Leveraging data from the Tennessee STAR class-size experiment, we show that Black students randomly assigned to at least one Black teacher in grades K-3 are 9 percentage points (13%) more likely to graduate from high school and 6 percentage points (19%) more likely to enroll in college than their same-school, same-race peers. No effect is found for white students. We replicate these findings using quasi-experimental methods to analyze a richer administrative data set from North Carolina. The increase in postsecondary enrollments is concentrated in two-year degree programs, which is somewhat concerning because two-year colleges have both lower returns and lower completion rates than four-year colleges and universities. These long-run effects are also concentrated among Black males from disadvantaged backgrounds, which is not evident in short run analyses of same-race teachers' impacts on test scores. These nuanced patterns are of policy relevance themselves and also underscore the importance of directly examining long-run treatment effects as opposed to extrapolating from estimated short-run effects.

Suggested Citation

Gershenson, Seth and Hart, Cassandra and Hyman, Joshua and Lindsay, Constance and Papageorge, Nicholas W., The Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers (November 2018). NBER Working Paper No. w25254, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3282954

Seth Gershenson (Contact Author)

American University - School of Public Affairs ( email )

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Cassandra Hart

University of California, Davis ( email )

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Joshua Hyman

University of Connecticut - Department of Public Policy ( email )

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University of Connecticut - Neag School of Education ( email )

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University of Connecticut - Department of Economics ( email )

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Constance Lindsay

American University ( email )

Nicholas W. Papageorge

Johns Hopkins University Department of Economics ( email )

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