Elite Schools and Opting-In: Effects of College Selectivity on Career and Family Outcomes

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See all articles by Suqin Ge

Suqin Ge

Virginia Tech - Department of Economics

Elliott Isaac

Tulane University - Department of Economics

Amalia R. Miller

University of Virginia - Department of Economics

Date Written: November 14, 2018

Abstract

Using College and Beyond data and a variant on Dale and Krueger's (2002) matched-applicant approach, this paper revisits the question of how attending an elite college affects later-life outcomes. We expand the scope along two dimensions: we do not restrict the sample to full-time full-year workers and we examine labor force participation, human capital, and family formation. For men, our findings echo those in Dale and Krueger (2002): controlling for selection eliminates the positive relationship between college selectivity and earnings. We also find no significant effects on men's educational or family outcomes. The results are quite different for women: we find effects on both career and family outcomes. Attending a school with a 100-point higher average SAT score increases women's probability of advanced degree attainment by 5 percentage points and earnings by 14 percent, while reducing their likelihood of marriage by 4 percentage points. The effect of college selectivity on own earnings is significantly larger for married than for single women. Among married women, selective college attendance significantly increases spousal education.

Keywords: College selectivity, Returns to schooling, Marriage market, Female labor supply, Advanced degree attainment

JEL Classification: I23, I23, J12, J16, J22

Suggested Citation

Ge, Suqin and Isaac, Elliott and Miller, Amalia R., Elite Schools and Opting-In: Effects of College Selectivity on Career and Family Outcomes (November 14, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=

Suqin Ge

Virginia Tech - Department of Economics ( email )

Department of Economics
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061
United States

Elliott Isaac

Tulane University - Department of Economics ( email )

New Orleans, LA 70118
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.elliottisaac.com

Amalia R. Miller (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 400182
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4182
United States

HOME PAGE: http://people.virginia.edu/~am5by/

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