The Cost of Being Faithful: What Do Farmers Give Up to Keep the Sabbath?

18 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2018

See all articles by Britney Rosburg

Britney Rosburg

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Terry Griffin

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Brian Coffey

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Date Written: November 17, 2018

Abstract

Judeo-Christian beliefs and tradition include observing a Sabbath, or day of rest, by abstaining from work one day each week. In modern times, followers of the Jewish faith mark the Sabbath from Friday evening to Saturday evening and Christians do so on Sunday. For both groups, this practice is firmly entrenched to the point that many would contend that working on Sunday is morally wrong. For many Christian workers in the United States, this practice often fits with their work schedule as Saturday and Sunday are typical days off for many schools, government organizations, and businesses. There are exceptions to this and farmers are one of the most obvious. The demands of managing a farm do not conform to uniform weekly work schedules. To meet labor requirements, many American family farms rely upon unpaid family labor to perform farm tasks such as conducting field operations. Reliance on unpaid labor is becoming more prevalent due to lack of available unskilled laborers in many locations in the United States.

Keywords: whole-farm planning, limited resource farms, labor, religion, network, community

JEL Classification: Z12, Q12, J22

Suggested Citation

Rosburg, Britney and Griffin, Terry and Coffey, Brian, The Cost of Being Faithful: What Do Farmers Give Up to Keep the Sabbath? (November 17, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3286359 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3286359

Britney Rosburg

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Manhatten, KS 66506-4001
United States

Terry Griffin (Contact Author)

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics ( email )

Manhatten, KS 66506-4001
United States

Brian Coffey

Kansas State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Manhatten, KS 66506-4001
United States

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