Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and Opioid Prescription Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample

23 Pages Posted: 4 Dec 2018 Last revised: 3 May 2019

See all articles by Orgul D. Ozturk

Orgul D. Ozturk

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics

Yuan Hong

University of South Carolina - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Suzanne McDermott

University of South Carolina

Margaret Turk

SUNY Upstate Medical University - Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Date Written: July 20, 2018

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the effect of variants of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) on the opioid prescriptions for individuals with longstanding physical conditions and those with inflammatory conditions, and compare them to other adult opioid users. These two groups are chosen because pain is a common and persistent complaint for people with these two categories of disability and in the literature most of the focus has been on people with acute and chronic pain in the general population. Using first an event study and then a difference-in-differences approach, our analyses show that PDMPs do not reduce opioid prescriptions for these two groups. Our data also shows that these two groups on average have higher incidence of continuous opioid use and much higher amounts prescribed compared to other adults who have opioid prescriptions. PDMPs do not appear to affect prescribers’ initial or ongoing use of opioids for longstanding disability-related pain management, thus placing adults with disability and pain at higher risk of dependency.

Keywords: opioid, prescribing, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, disability, healthcare disparities

JEL Classification: I11, I18, I14

Suggested Citation

Ozturk, Orgul D. and Hong, Yuan and McDermott, Suzanne and Turk, Margaret, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and Opioid Prescription Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample (July 20, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3293440 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3293440

Orgul D. Ozturk (Contact Author)

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

The Francis M. Hipp Building
1705 College Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States

Yuan Hong

University of South Carolina - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics ( email )

SC
United States

Suzanne McDermott

University of South Carolina ( email )

701 Main Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States

Margaret Turk

SUNY Upstate Medical University - Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ( email )

Syracuse
United States

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