The Effects of Differential Pay on Teacher Recruitment and Retention

39 Pages Posted: 7 Dec 2018

See all articles by Carycruz Bueno

Carycruz Bueno

Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Tim R. Sass

Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Date Written: May 1, 2018

Abstract

Traditionally, teacher salaries have been determined solely by experience and educational attainment. This has led to chronic shortages of teachers in particular subject areas, such as math, science and special education. We study the first long-running statewide program to differentiate teacher pay based on subject area, Georgia’s bonus system for math and science teachers. Using a difference-in-differences strategy, we find the bonuses reduce teacher attrition by 18 to 28 percent. However, we find no evidence the program increases the probability that education majors become secondary math or science teachers upon graduation or alters specific major choices within the education field.

Suggested Citation

Bueno, Carycruz and Sass, Tim, The Effects of Differential Pay on Teacher Recruitment and Retention (May 1, 2018). Andrew Young School of Policy Studies Research Paper Series No. 18-07. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3296427 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3296427

Carycruz Bueno

Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Department of Economics
35 Broad Street, 6th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States

Tim Sass (Contact Author)

Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies ( email )

Department of Economics
35 Broad Street, 6th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States
404-413-0150 (Phone)
404-413-0145 (Fax)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
88
Abstract Views
499
rank
294,668
PlumX Metrics