Becoming Global Citizens and Global Lawyers: Incorporating International Work and Study Experiences into the Australian Law School Curriculum

Connor T, Ries N, Ross N, Sobel-Read KB, Matas D (2018) ‘Becoming Global Citizens and Global Lawyers: Incorporating International Work and Study Experiences Into the Australian Law School Curriculum’, Clinical Law Review: a journal of lawyering and legal education, Vol 25, Pages 63-94 (2018)

32 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2019

See all articles by Tim Connor

Tim Connor

University of Newcastle (Australia) - Newcastle Law School

Nola M Ries

University of Technology Sydney (UTS)

Nicola M. Ross

Newcastle Law School

Kevin Sobel-Read

University of Newcastle (Australia) - School of Law

Daniel Matas

University of Newcastle (Australia) - Newcastle Law School

Date Written: October 29, 2018

Abstract

Much of the literature on global citizenship education asserts a perceived tension between “neoliberal cosmopolitanism” (enhancing students’ employability) and “critical democratic cosmopolitanism” (enhancing students’ critical understanding of cultural diversity and political and economic inequality). Lilley, Barker and Harris recently argued these two approaches need not necessarily be in tension because employers value the skills developed through more critical approaches. This article analyzes the reflective journals of 39 Australian law students who participated in intensive work and study experiences in Indo-Pacific countries. The students’ journals lend further weight to the thesis of Lilley, Barker and Harris, here specifically in regard to law studies. In line with the goals of “critical democratic cosmopolitanism,” the overseas experiences motivated the students to become more open-minded, self-critical and reflective in their thinking, and more confident, respectful and empathetic in their interactions with people of different cultures. A number of recent studies have indicated these kinds of skills and attributes are highly valued by employers of law graduates. For the law students, rather than identifying a tension between their ambition to become global lawyers and the responsibilities associated with global citizenship, the overseas experiences instead led them to frame their understanding of global lawyering in terms of positive global citizenship.

Keywords: International Study Experiences

Suggested Citation

Connor, Tim and Ries, Nola M and Ross, Nicola M. and Sobel-Read, Kevin and Matas, Daniel, Becoming Global Citizens and Global Lawyers: Incorporating International Work and Study Experiences into the Australian Law School Curriculum (October 29, 2018). Connor T, Ries N, Ross N, Sobel-Read KB, Matas D (2018) ‘Becoming Global Citizens and Global Lawyers: Incorporating International Work and Study Experiences Into the Australian Law School Curriculum’, Clinical Law Review: a journal of lawyering and legal education, Vol 25, Pages 63-94 (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3302976

Tim Connor (Contact Author)

University of Newcastle (Australia) - Newcastle Law School ( email )

1 University Drive
Callaghan, 2308
Australia

Nola M Ries

University of Technology Sydney (UTS) ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

Nicola M. Ross

Newcastle Law School ( email )

New Space
Level 5 409 Hunter St Newcastle NSW 2300
Newcastle, New South Wales 2300
Australia

Kevin Sobel-Read

University of Newcastle (Australia) - School of Law ( email )

409 Hunter Street
Newcastle, NSW 2300
Australia

Daniel Matas

University of Newcastle (Australia) - Newcastle Law School ( email )

1 University Drive
Callaghan, 2308
Australia

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