The Effect of Education on Medical Technology Adoption: Are the More Educated More Likely to Use New Drugs

46 Pages Posted: 14 Sep 2002 Last revised: 1 Jun 2013

See all articles by Adriana Lleras-Muney

Adriana Lleras-Muney

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Frank R. Lichtenberg

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Date Written: September 2002

Abstract

There is a large body of work that documents a strong, positive correlation between education and measures of health, but little is known about the mechanisms by which education might affect health. One possibility is that more educated individuals are more likely to adopt new medical technologies. We investigate this theory by asking whether more educated people are more likely to use newer drugs, while controlling for other individual characteristics, such as income and insurance status. Using the 1997 MEPS, we find that more highly educated people are more likely to use drugs more recently approved by the FDA. We find that education only matters for individuals who repeatedly purchase drugs for a given condition, suggesting that the more educated are better able to learn from experience.

Suggested Citation

Lleras-Muney, Adriana and Lichtenberg, Frank R., The Effect of Education on Medical Technology Adoption: Are the More Educated More Likely to Use New Drugs (September 2002). NBER Working Paper No. w9185, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=330324

Adriana Lleras-Muney (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Frank R. Lichtenberg

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )

3022 Broadway
504 Uris Hall, Dept. of Finance & Economics
New York, NY 10027
United States
212-854-4408 (Phone)
212-316-9219 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/detail/frl1

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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