Nudging Privacy: The Behavioral Economics of Personal Information

IEEE Security & Privacy, 6, 82--85

Posted: 6 Jan 2019

See all articles by Alessandro Acquisti

Alessandro Acquisti

Carnegie Mellon University - H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

In 356 B.C., a man started a fire that destroyed the temple of Artemis at Ephesus—one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. Captured by the citizens of the town and sentenced to death, he boasted that the arson had been motivated by the desire to gain fame and immortality. Today, like 2,000 years ago, many seek notoriety at the price of embarrassment, a tarnished reputation, or even infamy. In 2007, a new Facebook group came under media attention: 30 Reasons Girls Should Call It a Night counted “nearly 150,000 members and a collection of nearly 5,000 photos of young women passed out on the pavement, collapsed in shrubbery, peeing in bushes, and vomiting in toilets (or on themselves).” Most of the subjects had uploaded the photos themselves.

Keywords: Privacy, Nudging Privacy

Suggested Citation

Acquisti, Alessandro, Nudging Privacy: The Behavioral Economics of Personal Information (2009). IEEE Security & Privacy, 6, 82--85, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3305356

Alessandro Acquisti (Contact Author)

Carnegie Mellon University - H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
412-268-9853 (Phone)
412-268-5339 (Fax)

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