Long-Run Impacts of Agricultural Shocks on Educational Attainment: Evidence from the Boll Weevil

41 Pages Posted: 26 Dec 2018 Last revised: 28 May 2022

See all articles by Richard B. Baker

Richard B. Baker

The College of New Jersey

John Blanchette

University of California, Davis

Katherine Eriksson

University of California, Davis

Date Written: December 2018

Abstract

The boll weevil spread across the Southern United States from 1892 to 1922 having a devastating impact on cotton cultivation. The resulting shift away from this child labor–intensive crop lowered the opportunity cost of attending school, and thus the pest increased school enrollment and attendance. We investigate the insect’s long run affect on educational attainment using a sample of adults in 1940 linked back to themselves in childhood in the county in which they were likely educated. Both whites and blacks who were young (ages 4 to 9) when the boll weevil arrived saw increased educational attainment by 0.25 to 0.35 years. These findings are not driven by concurrent shocks and are not sensitive to linking method or sample selection. Our results demonstrate the potential for conflict between child labor in agriculture and educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

Baker, Richard B. and Blanchette, John and Eriksson, Katherine, Long-Run Impacts of Agricultural Shocks on Educational Attainment: Evidence from the Boll Weevil (December 2018). NBER Working Paper No. w25400, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3306112

Richard B. Baker (Contact Author)

The College of New Jersey ( email )

P.O. Box 7718
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
United States

John Blanchette

University of California, Davis

One Shields Avenue
Apt 153
Davis, CA 95616
United States

Katherine Eriksson

University of California, Davis ( email )

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