Cash Transfer Programs and Agricultural Production: The Case of Malawi

Posted: 8 Jan 2019

See all articles by Paul Winters

Paul Winters

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

Ryan Boone

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Benjamin Davis

UNICEF South Africa

Date Written: May 14, 2013

Abstract

Cash transfer programs are increasingly utilized to combat poverty and hunger while building the human capital of future generations; however, they have been faulted by some for failing to build the productive capacity of current generations. This article analyzes the impact of the Malawi Social Cash Transfer Scheme on agricultural production. The results show strong increases in ownership of productive agricultural assets, in time devoted to household farms, and in food types consumed from own production, coupled with a sharp decrease in ganyu labor, which is often used as a coping mechanism once food stores have been depleted. These results are most likely achieved by helping farmers overcome credit and liquidity constraints. This research shows that cash transfer programs can help the capacity of extremely poor farm households to expand agriculture production even if the goal of the program is focusing on other dimensions of poverty.

Suggested Citation

Winters, Paul and Boone, Ryan and Davis, Benjamin, Cash Transfer Programs and Agricultural Production: The Case of Malawi (May 14, 2013). Agricultural Economics, Vol. 44 (2013), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3306621

Paul Winters (Contact Author)

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) ( email )

Via Paolo di Dono
Rome, 00142
Italy

Ryan Boone

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Benjamin Davis

UNICEF South Africa ( email )

P. O. Box 4884
Pretoria
South Africa

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
79
PlumX Metrics