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Building Better Potassium Ion Batteries with Symmetric Electrodes

37 Pages Posted: 26 Feb 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Lei Zhang

Lei Zhang

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy; University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Binwei Zhang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Chengrui Wang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials; Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Yuhai Dou

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Qing Zhang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Yajie Liu

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Hong Gao

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Mohammad Al-Mamun

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Ying Wang

Jiangsu Normal University - School of Chemistry & Materials Science

Wei Kong Pang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Zaiping Guo

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Shi Xue Dou

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Hua Kun Liu

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

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Abstract

Symmetric full-cells, which employ two identical electrodes as both the cathode and anode, attract great research attention, because it has high level of safety, facial practical fabrication process and lower manufacturing costs. Unfortunately, the practical utilization of full symmetric energy storage systems, especially the symmetric potassium ion batteries (KIBs), is hindered by the limited choice of the available electrode materials. In this work, a novel NASICON-type K3V2(PO4)3 is prepared and first employed for the symmetric KIBs. Through in-situ measurement, a highly lattice reversibility is found during the K+ insertion/extraction process. KV2(PO4)3 and K5V2(PO4)3 was generated after the depotassiation and potassiation process at about 4.0 V and below 1.0 V, respectively. The reversible capacity of the full symmetric KIBs is about 90 mAh g-1 between 0.01–3.0 V at 25 mA g-1, corresponding to an initial coulombic efficiency of 91.7 % which is the highest one among all the previous reported symmetric energy storage systems (including the symmetric lithium/sodium ion batteries). 88.6 % reversible capacity was maintained even after 500 cycling test. More importantly, a largest working potential at about 2.3 V was obtained in this work, benefiting the output energy of this symmetric energy storage system. The outstanding cycling stability, large working potential and the highest initial coulombic efficiency endow this work with promising advantages for the future development of the novel energy storage system.

Suggested Citation

Zhang, Lei and Zhang, Binwei and Wang, Chengrui and Dou, Yuhai and Zhang, Qing and Liu, Yajie and Gao, Hong and Al-Mamun, Mohammad and Wang, Ying and Pang, Wei Kong and Guo, Zaiping and Dou, Shi Xue and Liu, Hua Kun, Building Better Potassium Ion Batteries with Symmetric Electrodes (December 28, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3307381 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3307381
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Lei Zhang (Contact Author)

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Queensland
Australia

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Binwei Zhang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Chengrui Wang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Queensland
Australia

Yuhai Dou

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Queensland
Australia

Qing Zhang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Yajie Liu

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Hong Gao

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Mohammad Al-Mamun

Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Centre for Clean Environment and Energy

Queensland
Australia

Ying Wang

Jiangsu Normal University - School of Chemistry & Materials Science

Jiangsu, 221116
China

Wei Kong Pang

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Zaiping Guo

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Shi Xue Dou

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

Hua Kun Liu

University of Wollongong - Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials

Wollongong, New South Wales 2522
Australia

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