lancet-header
Preprints with The Lancet is part of SSRN´s First Look, a place where journals and other research experts identify content of interest prior to publication. These preprint papers are not peer-reviewed. Authors have either opted in at submission to The Lancet family of journals to post their preprints on Preprints with The Lancet, or submitted directly via SSRN. The usual SSRN checks and a Lancet-specific check for appropriateness and transparency have been applied. Preprints available here are not Lancet publications or necessarily under review with a Lancet journal. These papers should not be used for clinical decision making or reporting of research to a lay audience without indicating that this is preliminary research that has not been peer-reviewed. For more information see the Comment published in The Lancet, or visit The Lancet´s FAQ page, and for any feedback please contact preprints@lancet.com

Extent and Predictors of Enduring Mental Health in Childhood (Up to 14 Years): Learning from the Millennium Cohort Study

22 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2019

See all articles by Jessica Deighton

Jessica Deighton

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

Suzet Tanya Lereya

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

Miranda Wolpert

University College London - Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology; Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

More...

Abstract

Background: Enduring mental health (EMH) is a new concept introduced by Schaefer et al and refers to a long-term state of not experiencing a mental illness (i.e. enduring mental wellness). No analysis using this concept has been undertaken on UK data nor specifically in the childhood years.

Methods: The present study seeks to consider the extent and predictors of EMH in children aged 9 months to 14 years who were part of the UK-wide Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). Data from 13,310 children (49.4% girls) from children at ages 9 months 3, 5, 7, 11, 14 years.

Outcomes: Less than half of children (41%) fell into the category of EMH, the rest had at least some periods of mental health problems. Factors associated with EMH included high income, home ownership, positive parent-child interaction and maternal mental health. Of particular note was the high association between good emotion regulation and intellectual capacity, enjoyment of school and EMH status.

Interpretation: This suggests that EMH is not the norm during childhood. Identification of the high association between both economic wellbeing and emotional regulation with EMH offer the opportunity for a potentially powerful combination of community and individual initiatives. These might include: tackling social inequalities, supporting positive mental health of the primary care giver, supporting positive caregiver-child interactions in the early years, enhancing school engagement, and strengthening the child's social and emotional skills, including independence, cooperation and self-regulation to prevent later mental health problems.

Funding Statement: The research was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) North Thames at Bart’s Health NHS Trust. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Declaration of Interests: The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Ethics Approval Statement: Ethical approval for the MCS was received from a Research Ethics Committee at each sweep.

Keywords: mental health, children, cohort

Suggested Citation

Deighton, Jessica and Lereya, Suzet Tanya and Wolpert, Miranda, Extent and Predictors of Enduring Mental Health in Childhood (Up to 14 Years): Learning from the Millennium Cohort Study (July 1, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3311852 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3311852

Jessica Deighton

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

12 Maresfield Gardens
London, NW3 5SU
United Kingdom

Suzet Tanya Lereya

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

12 Maresfield Gardens
London, NW3 5SU
United Kingdom

Miranda Wolpert (Contact Author)

University College London - Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology

17 Queen Square
London WC1N 3AR
United Kingdom

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, Hampstead Site

12 Maresfield Gardens
London, NW3 5SU
United Kingdom

Click here to go to TheLancet.com

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
345
Downloads
64