Did (and Does) the Irish Border Matter?

Working Papers in British-Irish Studies No. 60, 2006

33 Pages Posted: 25 Jan 2019

See all articles by Cormac O'Grada

Cormac O'Grada

University College Dublin (UCD)

Brendan Walsh

University College Dublin (UCD) - Department of Economics

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

This paper examines how the two parts of Ireland were affected by the partition of the country in 1922. It examines the post-partition evolution of living standards north and south, and patterns of trade, migration, and road and rail traffic between the two since 1922. A separate section looks at the effects of living near the border on population trends. Bearing in mind the difficulty of establishing a relevant counter- factual—what would have happened in the absence of partition—we conclude that while it is possible to discern a “partition effect”, it is smaller and less significant than is widely perceived. The evidence we present is a salutary warning against great expectations about the possible economic gains from the dismantling the barriers erected between the two parts of Ireland after 1922.

Keywords: Borders, Ireland, Trade

JEL Classification: F14, N14

Suggested Citation

O'Grada, Cormac and Walsh, Brendan, Did (and Does) the Irish Border Matter? (2006). Working Papers in British-Irish Studies No. 60, 2006 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3315685 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3315685

Cormac O'Grada (Contact Author)

University College Dublin (UCD) ( email )

Dublin 4, 4
Ireland

Brendan Walsh

University College Dublin (UCD) - Department of Economics ( email )

Belfield
Dublin 4, Dublin 4
Ireland

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
18
Abstract Views
241
PlumX Metrics