Subjective Well-Being and Peaceful Uprisings

47 Pages Posted: 17 Jan 2019 Last revised: 18 Jan 2019

See all articles by Caroline T. Witte

Caroline T. Witte

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Department of Applied Economics

Martijn J. Burger

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Erasmus School of Economics (ESE); Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM)

Elena Ianchovichina

World Bank

Date Written: January 16, 2019

Abstract

This study analyzes whether subjective well-being measures can explain variation in peaceful uprisings, in addition to the objective measures typically used in analyses of this type of events. Using data on uprisings and subjective well-being for 118 countries from 2007 to 2014 -- a period during which nonviolent conflict became increasingly prevalent -- the study finds evidence of a positive effect of life dissatisfaction on the incidence of peaceful uprising, but not its violent counterpart. This effect does not depend on the type of political regime, nor the stage of development, and, to a large extent, it reflects changes in perceived satisfaction with living standards and the ability to have a purposeful and meaningful life.

Keywords: Inflation, Inequality, Social Conflict and Violence, Armed Conflict, Economic Growth, Industrial Economics, Economic Theory & Research

Suggested Citation

Witte, Caroline T. and Burger, Martijn J. and Ianchovichina, Elena, Subjective Well-Being and Peaceful Uprisings (January 16, 2019). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 8705. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3317211

Caroline T. Witte (Contact Author)

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Department of Applied Economics ( email )

Netherlands

Martijn J. Burger

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) ( email )

Burg. Oudlaan 50
Rotterdam, NL 3062 PA
Netherlands

Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM) ( email )

P.O. Box 1738
3000 DR Rotterdam
Netherlands

Elena Ianchovichina

World Bank ( email )

1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States
202-458-8910 (Phone)
202-522-1159 (Fax)

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