‘Squizzy’ and the Cuckold: How Majority Jury Verdicts got their Australian Foothold

(2018) 45 Australian Bar Review

U. of Adelaide Law Research Paper No. 2019-14

Posted: 24 Jan 2019

See all articles by Greg Taylor

Greg Taylor

University of Adelaide - School of Law; University of Marburg; RMIT University - Graduate School of Business and Law

Date Written: January 23, 2019

Abstract

Majority jury verdicts in criminal cases were introduced far earlier in South Australia than in most comparable places. A number of factors combined to produce this result: one was the South Australian Law Reform Commission of 1923–27, a body which can now be seen as ahead of its time despite the ridicule heaped upon it by Mr Justice Evatt because it was not staffed by lawyers. It uncovered and mobilised a substantial degree of support for majority verdicts among the leaders of the profession. In Victoria in the same decade there was a great deal of anxiety about jury squaring (rigging) based partly on rumours surrounding the notorious gangster ‘Squizzy’ Taylor. This spread to South Australia, and, unlike the Victorian, the South Australian legislature was in a position to take decisive action. Nevertheless, rumours of and even proof of jury squaring continued after majority verdicts were introduced.

Keywords: jury verdicts, jury

JEL Classification: K10

Suggested Citation

Taylor, Greg, ‘Squizzy’ and the Cuckold: How Majority Jury Verdicts got their Australian Foothold (January 23, 2019). (2018) 45 Australian Bar Review; U. of Adelaide Law Research Paper No. 2019-14. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3320925

Greg Taylor (Contact Author)

University of Adelaide - School of Law ( email )

Ligertwood Building
Adelaide 5005, South Australia SA 5005
Australia

University of Marburg ( email )

Universitätsstrasse 24
Marburg, D-35032
Germany

RMIT University - Graduate School of Business and Law ( email )

Melbourne
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
112
PlumX Metrics