Living, Aging, and Dying in Healthy and Just Societies: Life Lessons From my Father

Milbank Quarterly, Forthcoming

8 Pages Posted: 7 Feb 2019 Last revised: 8 Feb 2019

See all articles by Lawrence O. Gostin

Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown University - Law Center - O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law

Date Written: January 18, 2019

Abstract

My father passed away at 102 years old. He lived, aged, and died well. But that is rare in the United States and globally. The World Health Organization defines palliative care “throughout the life course” as improving quality of life for patients and families and relieving pain and suffering, while paying special attention to physical, psychosocial, and spiritual functioning. That’s the global vision, but then there’s the reality. Palliative care, in practice, has been little more than pain relief at life’s end — and in much of the world, not even that.

We need to reimagine palliation, embracing a communal or relational ethics of caring for the whole person, embedded in families and communities. What would healthy living, aging, and dying in a just society look like?

Keywords: health law, health policy, palliative care, pain relief, health inequality, health care injustice

Suggested Citation

Gostin, Lawrence O., Living, Aging, and Dying in Healthy and Just Societies: Life Lessons From my Father (January 18, 2019). Milbank Quarterly, Forthcoming . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3321913

Lawrence O. Gostin (Contact Author)

Georgetown University - Law Center - O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law ( email )

600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001
United States
202-662-9038 (Phone)
202-662-9055 (Fax)

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