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Quantum Dots in Biomedical Applications

51 Pages Posted: 28 Jan 2019 First Look: Accepted

See all articles by Angela M. Wagner

Angela M. Wagner

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine

Jennifer M. Knipe

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine

Gorka Orive

Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU) - NanoBioCel Group; Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN); University Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Oral Implantology (UIRMI)

Nicholas A. Peppas

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering; University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine; University of Texas at Austin - Department of Biomedical Engineering; University of Texas at Austin - Department of Pediatrics; University of Texas at Austin - Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care; University of Texas at Austin - Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery

Abstract

Semiconducting nanocrystals, more commonly known as quantum dots, possess unique size and shape dependent optoelectronic properties. In recent years, these unique properties have attracted much attention in the biomedical field to enable real-time tissue imaging (bioimaging), diagnostics, single molecule sensors, and drug delivery, among many other areas. The optical properties of quantum dots can be tuned by size and composition, and their small size and high surface area make them excellent candidates for intracellular tracking, diagnostics, in vivo imaging, and therapeutic delivery. We discuss recent advances and challenges in the molecular design of quantum dots are discussed, along with applications of quantum dots as drug delivery vehicles, theranostic agents, single molecule sensors, and real-time in vivo deep tissue imaging agents. We present a detailed discussion of the biodistribution and toxicity of quantum dots, and highlight recent advances to improve long-term stability in biological buffers, increase quantum yield following bioconjugation, and improve clearance from the body. Last, we present an outlook on future challenges and strategies to further advance translation to clinical application.

Keywords: bioimaging, nanotechnology, theranostics, drug delivery, molecular sensors

Suggested Citation

Wagner, Angela M. and Knipe, Jennifer M. and Orive, Gorka and Peppas, Nicholas A., Quantum Dots in Biomedical Applications (January 25, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3321961 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3321961

Angela M. Wagner

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

Jennifer M. Knipe

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

Gorka Orive

Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU) - NanoBioCel Group

Barrio Sarriena s/n
Leioa, Bizkaia 48940
Spain

Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN)

Vitoria-Gasteiz
Spain

University Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Oral Implantology (UIRMI)

Vitoria
Spain

Nicholas A. Peppas (Contact Author)

University of Texas at Austin - McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Biomedical Engineering ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Pediatrics ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

University of Texas at Austin - Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

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