Private Vaccination and Public Health: An Empirical Examination for U.S. Measles

JOURNAL OF HUMAN RESOURCES, Vol. 31, No. 3, Summer 1996

Posted: 18 Sep 1996

See all articles by Tomas Philipson

Tomas Philipson

University of Chicago; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Abstract

This paper investigates the degree to which the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases affects vaccination efforts against such diseases. Using data from the National Health Interview Survey on measles vaccinations in the United States between 1984 and 1990, the paper shows there is strong evidence that the prevalence of measles in the respondent's state of residence reduces the age in months at which the first measles vaccination occurs. The paper argues that the more prevention of infectious disease responds to prevalence in this manner, the less it responds to price, thereby lowering the role of Pigouvian price subsidies and other demand-stimulating public health measures aimed at solving the under-provision of vaccines and other preventative efforts with positive external effects.

JEL Classification: I18

Suggested Citation

Philipson, Tomas J., Private Vaccination and Public Health: An Empirical Examination for U.S. Measles. JOURNAL OF HUMAN RESOURCES, Vol. 31, No. 3, Summer 1996. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3326

Tomas J. Philipson (Contact Author)

University of Chicago ( email )

Graduate School of Business
1101 East 58th Street
Chicago, 60637
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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