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Metabolic Syndrome - A New Paradigm: Need for Capacity Building of Health Care Workers for Early Screening in the Rural Indian Population

38 Pages Posted: 5 Feb 2019

See all articles by Arun Maiya

Arun Maiya

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

Prabhath Matpady

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

Shubha Gundmi

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

Parameshwar Anche

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

A Sampath Kumar

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

B Ananthakrishna Shastri

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Ramachandra Lingadakai

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Ashma Monterio

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

KN Shiva Shankar

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Shashi Kiran Umakanth

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Faculty of Medicine

Sahana Shetty

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Vasudeva Upadyaya

Government of Karnataka

David G. Armstrong

University of Southern California - Keck School of Medicine

Edward Jude

University of Manchester - Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

More...

Abstract

Background: We continue to experience an inexorable transition from communicable to chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD), worldwide. This is especially true in India, where it appears that metabolic syndrome (MetS) is increasing in prevalence due to rapid economic growth, change in food intake and physical inactivity have lead to increase in MetS. However access to health service is poor in India and proper assessment for metabolic disease is often lacking. Accredited Social Health Activists(ASHA) are available throughout India for doing house to house assessment and providing health care, a potential solution for identifying people with abnormal metabolic factors. The aim of this study was to conduct capacity building of ASHA workers for screening of metabolic syndrome in rural India and identify people in rural India with features of MetS.  

Methods: After obtaining approval from institutional ethics committee 300 ASHAs were trained under World Diabetes Foundation fundedproject (WDF15-941) about aspects ofMetS, diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot. Hand holding training activities were held for each ASHA intheir respective area of practice. This was conducted by project staffs. Participants over the ageof 30 years were screened for the presence of MetS. Random blood glucose (RBS), blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were measured.  

Results: A total of 38,346 people were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome,of which13,911(36.3%) were found to have MetS of which 4200(35.9%) were male and 9,711(37.2%) were female. Those with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) 1,555(36.7%) also had MetS. Among 3 diagnostic criteria, waist circumference was the highest with 34.1%. Individual with impaired random glucose levels have 1.5 times more risk of developing metabolic syndrome adjusted for age and gender.  

Conclusion: In conclusion, MetS was present in 36.3% participants residing in rural part of Indiai.e one third of the population. Amongst people with T2DM 36.7% had MetS. The result suggest better screening and early identification of these people will help in proper treatment which might reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Funding: The field screening was conducted as a part of ongoing project funded by World Diabetes
Foundation WDF 15-941 “Diabetic Foot care: Stepping Ahead”.

Declaration of Interest: The author(s) declare no potential conflict of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Ethical Approval: The study was initiated after obtaining the approval from institutional research committee and institutional ethics committee (IEC 700/2015).

Keywords: Metabolic syndrome, Screening, Rural Udupi

Suggested Citation

Maiya, Arun and Matpady, Prabhath and Gundmi, Shubha and Anche, Parameshwar and Kumar, A Sampath and Shastri, B Ananthakrishna and Lingadakai, Ramachandra and Monterio, Ashma and Shankar, KN Shiva and Umakanth, Shashi Kiran and Shetty, Sahana and Upadyaya, Vasudeva and Armstrong, David G. and Jude, Edward, Metabolic Syndrome - A New Paradigm: Need for Capacity Building of Health Care Workers for Early Screening in the Rural Indian Population (January 31, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3327357

Arun Maiya (Contact Author)

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research ( email )

India

Prabhath Matpady

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

India

Shubha Gundmi

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

India

Parameshwar Anche

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

India

A Sampath Kumar

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Centre for Diabetic Foot Care & Research

India

B Ananthakrishna Shastri

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, IA Karnataka 576104
India

Ramachandra Lingadakai

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, IA Karnataka 576104
India

Ashma Monterio

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, IA Karnataka 576104
India

KN Shiva Shankar

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, IA Karnataka 576104
India

Shashi Kiran Umakanth

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE) - Faculty of Medicine

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, Karnataka 576104
India

Sahana Shetty

Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)

Madhav Nagar
Udupi
Manipal, IA Karnataka 576104
India

Vasudeva Upadyaya

Government of Karnataka

Kengeri Post, Bangalore-Mysore Road
Bangalore, 5600 60
India

David G. Armstrong

University of Southern California - Keck School of Medicine

Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Edward Jude

University of Manchester - Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

Oxford Road
Manchester, M13 9PL
United Kingdom

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