Molecular Mechanism of Vitronectin Structural Evolution on Distinct Surface Chemistries: The Mediation for Cell Adhesion

25 Pages Posted: 11 Feb 2019

See all articles by Tianjie Li

Tianjie Li

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering; South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction

Lijing Hao

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering; South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction

Jiangyu Li

University of Washington - Department of Mechanical Engineering

Chang Du

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering; South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction; South China University of Technology - Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Engineering

Yingjun Wang

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering; South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction; South China University of Technology - Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Engineering

Date Written: February 11, 2019

Abstract

Surface chemistry of biomaterials plays a fundamental role in the adsorption of vitronectin (Vn), a crucial mediator for cell adhesion. However, the detailed structural information and dynamics mechanism of Vn adsorption to distinct surface chemistries relevant to its biological effect remains elusive. Herein, the conformation and orientation evolution during Vn adsorption to self-assembled monolayers terminating with -COOH, -NH2, -CH3 and -OH were investigated. To unravel the interplay between cell binding and surface charge and wettability, the N-terminal somatomedin-B domain housing the cell-binding motif of Vn was recruited in molecular dynamics simulations optimized with orientation initialization by Monte Carlo method. Experimental evidences including protein adsorption, cell adhesion and integrin gene expressions were thoroughly investigated. The adsorption of Vn on different surface chemistries showed very complex profiles. Cell adhesion was enabled on all the Vn-adsorbed surfaces but with distinct mechanisms relating to the adsorption quantity and orientation of Vn. The negatively charged surface (COOH) and the hydrophobic surface (CH3) adsorbed Vn with higher quantity and density. However, advantageous orientations with unrestrained and active cell-binding RGD loops were only obtained on the charged surfaces (COOH and NH2) instead of the non-charged (CH3 and OH). Specifically, the negatively charged surface stretched and stood up the Vn into a higher density, whereas the hydrophobic surface squashed the Vn into higher density multilayer by tracking adsorption but with the RGD loops restrained. These findings may have a broad implication on the understanding of Vn functionality as well as the designing of advanced biomaterials.

Keywords: Vitronectin, Protein adsorption, Biomaterial surface, Cell adhesion, Molecular dynamic simulation

Suggested Citation

Li, Tianjie and Hao, Lijing and Li, Jiangyu and Du, Chang and Wang, Yingjun, Molecular Mechanism of Vitronectin Structural Evolution on Distinct Surface Chemistries: The Mediation for Cell Adhesion (February 11, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3332619 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3332619

Tianjie Li (Contact Author)

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

Lijing Hao

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

Jiangyu Li

University of Washington - Department of Mechanical Engineering

Seattle, WA 98195
United States

Chang Du

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Engineering ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

Yingjun Wang

South China University of Technology - Department of Biomedical Engineering ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

South China University of Technology - Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Engineering ( email )

Wushan
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640
China

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