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Decoupling of Rates of Protein Synthesis from Cell Expansion Leads to Supergrowth

70 Pages Posted: 19 Feb 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Benjamin D. Knapp

Benjamin D. Knapp

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology; Stanford University - Biophysics Graduate Program

Pascal Odermatt

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology; Stanford University - Department of Bioengineering

Enrique R. Rojas

Stanford University - Department of Bioengineering; Stanford University - Department of Biochemistry

Wenpeng Cheng

Zhejiang University - College of Life Sciences

Xiangwei He

Zhejiang University - College of Life Sciences

Kerwyn Casey Huang

Stanford University - Biophysics Graduate Program; Stanford University - Chan Zuckerberg Biohub

Fred Chang

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology

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Abstract

Cell growth is a complex process in which cells synthesize cellular components while they increase in size. It is generally assumed that the rate of biosynthesis must somehow be coordinated with the rate of growth in order to maintain intracellular concentrations. However, little is known about potential feedback mechanisms that could achieve proteome homeostasis, or the consequences when this homeostasis is perturbed. Here, we identified conditions in which fission yeast cells are prevented from volume expansion but nevertheless continue to synthesize biomass, leading to global accumulation of proteins and increased cytoplasmic density. Upon removal of these perturbations, this biomass accumulation drove cells to undergo a multi-generational period of “supergrowth” in which rapid volume growth outpaced biosynthesis, returning proteome concentrations back to normal within hours. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism for global proteome homeostasis based on modulation of volume growth and dilution.

Suggested Citation

Knapp, Benjamin D. and Odermatt, Pascal and Rojas, Enrique R. and Cheng, Wenpeng and He, Xiangwei and Huang, Kerwyn Casey and Chang, Fred, Decoupling of Rates of Protein Synthesis from Cell Expansion Leads to Supergrowth (February 15, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3334978 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3334978
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Benjamin D. Knapp

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology

San Francisco, CA
United States

Stanford University - Biophysics Graduate Program

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Pascal Odermatt

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology

San Francisco, CA
United States

Stanford University - Department of Bioengineering

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Enrique R. Rojas

Stanford University - Department of Bioengineering

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Stanford University - Department of Biochemistry

B400 Beckman Center
CA 94305-5307
United States

Wenpeng Cheng

Zhejiang University - College of Life Sciences

866 Yuhangtang Road
Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058
China

Xiangwei He

Zhejiang University - College of Life Sciences

866 Yuhangtang Road
Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058
China

Kerwyn Casey Huang (Contact Author)

Stanford University - Biophysics Graduate Program ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Stanford University - Chan Zuckerberg Biohub ( email )

499 Illinois Street
San Francisco, CA 94158
United States

Fred Chang

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Cell and Tissue Biology ( email )

San Francisco, CA
United States

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