Clientelism and Corruption: Institutional Adaptation of State Capture Strategies in View of Resource Scarcity in Greece

The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Volume: 19, Issue: 2, page(s): 263-281

36 Pages Posted: 11 Mar 2019

See all articles by Aris Trantidis

Aris Trantidis

University of Lincoln (UK) - School of Social Sciences

Vasiliki Tsagkroni

Leiden University

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

How do strategies of state capture adapt to tight fiscal conditions? The article uses a historical institutionalist approach and content analysis to study the case of Greece. Three theoretically relevant patterns of institutional adaptation are unearthed: first, limited resources for state capture do indeed trigger self-limitation initiatives as expected, but these initiatives replace costly benefits with less costly ones. Second, different forms of capture have different implications for the terms of political competition. Third, there is a mutually reinforcing relationship between clientelism and corruption, which becomes pronounced in the creative ways by which strategies of capture adjust to shifting opportunities and constraints. Clients are appointed in state offices and extract bribes directly from citizens. ‘Client corruption’ replaces extraction from the state with extraction through the state, which is less costly for the public finances: the benefit the governing party gives to its clients is the ‘right’ to extract rents for themselves.

Keywords: Clientelism, Content Analysis, Corruption, Greece, Greek Politics, Historical Institutionalism, Media and Politics, Patronage, State Capture

JEL Classification: P1, P16, Z18

Suggested Citation

Trantidis, Aris and Tsagkroni, Vasiliki, Clientelism and Corruption: Institutional Adaptation of State Capture Strategies in View of Resource Scarcity in Greece (2014). The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Volume: 19, Issue: 2, page(s): 263-281, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3338030 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3338030

Aris Trantidis (Contact Author)

University of Lincoln (UK) - School of Social Sciences ( email )

Lincoln
United Kingdom

Vasiliki Tsagkroni

Leiden University ( email )

Postbus 9500
Leiden, Zuid Holland 2300 RA
Netherlands

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