The Promise of Ecological Regulation: The Case of Intensive Meat

Jurimetrics, Vol. 59, 2018, pp. 15-42

29 Pages Posted: 21 Feb 2019

See all articles by Christine Parker

Christine Parker

Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne

Fiona Haines

University of Melbourne School of Social and Political Sciences; Australian National University (ANU)

Laura Boehm

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Law School

Date Written: 2018

Abstract

Eating less intensive meat is a solution to many problems: to human and ecological health and to the intense cruelty visited upon the millions of intensively bred animals across the globe. This Article outlines the contribution regulation makes to this problem and how it might be part of the solution. It begins by summarizing why intensive meat production generates so many problems that cut across regulatory domains. It then shows how current forms of regulation fail to grapple with the intersecting harms generated by intensive meat, highlighting the need for an ecological makeover for regulation itself. Further, regulation, as an instrumental form of law and policy implementation, neglects the interconnected challenges of the whole system. Regulatory scholarship, in the form of responsive regulation, provides ways to overcome at least some of the social aspects of regulatory failure. Yet the Article shows, drawing on two brief case examples highlighting an instrumental and responsive regulatory approach, that the ecological weakness of regulation is often overlooked. Finally, the Article teases out the characteristics of ecologically responsive regulation that can contribute to lowering meat consumption and then examines nascent regulatory tools and strategies that could be refashioned to encourage a shift towards an ecologically rich and socially resilient future.

Keywords: ecological health, intensive meat production

JEL Classification: K00, K32

Suggested Citation

Parker, Christine and Haines, Fiona and Boehm, Laura, The Promise of Ecological Regulation: The Case of Intensive Meat (2018). Jurimetrics, Vol. 59, 2018, pp. 15-42, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3338233

Christine Parker (Contact Author)

Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne ( email )

University Square
185 Pelham Street, Carlton
Victoria, Victoria 3010
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://law.unimelb.edu.au/about/staff/christine-parker

Fiona Haines

University of Melbourne School of Social and Political Sciences ( email )

Level 4, John Medley Building
Melbourne, VIC 3010
Australia

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

Laura Boehm

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Law School ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Melbourne, VIC 3010
Australia

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