Two Different Conflicts in Federal Systems: An Application to Canada

23 Pages Posted: 21 Feb 2019

See all articles by Jack Mintz

Jack Mintz

University of Calgary - The School of Public Policy; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: 2018

Abstract

Two different forms of regional conflict occur in a federation: conflict of taste and conflict of claim. These conflicts may support each other but not necessarily – they are independent in concept and have different implications for regional tensions. Conflict of taste arises from differences in political preferences amongst populations arising from institutions, historical context and culture. Conflict of claim arises from one region having greater wealth than others and being expected to share it with others. The latter is particularly problematical when the rich region is small and has little influence in determining transfers as large per capita transfers from a small rich are needed to have any significant impact on large populated poor regions. While, both conflicts lead to regional stress and a possible break-up of a federation, conflict of claim can be divisive since it focuses on sharing the pie rather than creating the pie. The concepts are applied to Canada's federation.

Suggested Citation

Mintz, Jack, Two Different Conflicts in Federal Systems: An Application to Canada (2018). CESifo Working Paper No. 7282. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3338607

Jack Mintz (Contact Author)

University of Calgary - The School of Public Policy ( email )

Calgary, Alberta
Canada
403-220-7661 (Phone)

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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